4 amazing relaxation techniques that will help you sleep like a baby

4 amazing relaxation techniques that will help you sleep like a baby

How often do you toss and turn in your bed in the evening, worrying about the future (or the past) and not being able to fall asleep? Time to get back that deep, peaceful babies’ sleep – here are 4 amazing and efficient relaxation techniques that might help!

Relaxation technique #1: Deep breathing
Deep breathing is all about learning how to breathe deep into the abdomen, and not just into the chest – it takes some practice in the beginning, but once you master it you will be able to effectively use your breathing for falling asleep (and many other activities, too). For starters remember to breathe slowly and in a controlled manner – 5 seconds breathe in through your nose, 5 seconds breathe out through your mouth.
What does it do to help sleep?
It slows down breathing and relaxes the muscles – but that is not all! It can also slow your heart rate, allowing the body to calm down, plus chase away all that negative thoughts that are pestering your evenings.
Who is it appropriate for?
Practically everybody! It can also be combined with other relaxation techniques, so it can be used in a variety of situations for a variety of purposes (not only falling asleep).

Relaxation technique #2: Progressive muscle relaxation
You have surely heard of this term before, right? You just probably don’t know what it means… Well, it is a technique that gradually relaxes individual muscles of the body, eventually calming down the whole body to enable it to fall asleep easier. How to do it? Start with your toes – flex them for a few seconds and release them. Move up through the body, continuing with lower leg muscles, upper leg muscles and so on, repeating the process of flexing and releasing. Repeat the whole process 2-3 times.
What does it do to help sleep?
What doesn’t it do? It relaxes the muscles of the body while at the same time supporting the feeling of mental relaxation. It deters your attention from your worries, forcing you to focus on relaxing your individual muscles.
Who is it appropriate for?
It may not be useful for people with certain disabilities, but otherwise it can be used by anyone for a variety of purposes and in a variety of settings (for example in your bed in the evening, in the office chair during lunch time etc.).

Relaxation technique #3: Meditation
Probably the best known relaxation technique out there, meditation has been used for millennia to rest the mind, recover strength or relax the body. If you are a complete beginner in meditation, we recommend guided meditation, which will help you reach into your farthest depths and – hopefully – find sleep there. 
What does it do to help sleep?
Its passive (usually sitting) position helps calm down the body, but the main effect of meditation (when done right) is emptying one’s mind and freeing it from any worries.
Who is it appropriate for?
In general, it can be used by anyone, but in reality meditation proves a very difficult task to those who are overly impatient, hyperactive or lacking time.

Relaxation technique #4: The mysterious under-1-minute sleep 4-7-8 method
Developed by a known US sleep expert, Andrew Weir, this method is supposed to convince your body and mind to fall asleep in under one minute. Curious? Unfortunately we can’t reveal it at the moment…just kidding (laughter can be a relaxation technique, too)! The base of this method comes from yoga breathing, where the tip of the tongue is behind front teeth. Simply inhale quietly through the nose for 4 seconds, hold your breath for 7 seconds and exhale forcefully and completely (and loudly) through the mouth for 8 seconds. Repeat 2-4 times. Simple, right?
What does it do to help sleep?
According to the man who devised it, it fills the lungs almost completely with fresh air, providing the body and the mind with more oxygen, which leads to a state of extreme calm.
Who is it appropriate for?
Practically anyone can use this technique and its additional bonus is that it lasts only about a minute (or sometimes even less), so it can be done anywhere, anytime. Feeling sleepy already?